Some jobs require extensive training, preparation, or specialized skills. Surgeons and engineers, for example, must attain years of graduate training and experience because, without it, they could make fatal errors. Lawyers must learn a complicated system of rules and laws before they can practice, and chefs, writers, and visual artists must have finely honed skill sets to succeed.

Still, some employers are happy to train their workers on the job because it allows a worker to gain competency once they are employed. One kind of training, short-term training, consists of on-the-job experience and informal training that lasts no longer than a month. This can also include employer-sponsored training programs. This kind of training will become more common as total employment is projected to increase by 11.9 million jobs from 2020 to 2030, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

For that reason, Tovuti LMS identified occupations that offer short-term on-the-job training and are projected to rapidly increase hiring in the next decade using BLS data. All jobs on this list are forecast to have 50,000 or more new job openings from 2020 to 2030. They are sorted in order of increasing 2021 median pay.

Many of the jobs on the list are in the leisure and hospitality industry, which took the largest hit during the pandemic. Employers are ramping up hiring as people resume traveling and attending in-person events. The health care and social assistance industry is projected to add the most jobs overall—accounting for about 1 in 4 new hires, per the BLS.

Click through for a look at the 14 fastest-growing professions with on-the-job training.

A man giving his ticket to a woman in the lobby of a theater
ALPA PROD // Shutterstock

Ushers, lobby attendants, and ticket takers

– Projected growth by 2030: 50,400 jobs (to be up 62% from 2020)
– Median pay in 2021: $24,440
– Entry-level education needed: No formal educational credential

All forms of entertainment employment took a hit during the COVID-19 pandemic when many theaters and other entertainment venues were forced to close. Now that these establishments have reopened for business, ushers, lobby attendants, and ticket takers are once again in demand to assist audiences. What’s more, many offer on-the-job training, as the specifics of every venue and event may be different, requiring managers to train people in real-time.

An amusement park attendant checking a bumper car for safety
James Kirkikis // Shutterstock

Amusement and recreation attendants

– Projected growth by 2030: 85,400 jobs (up 32% from 2020)
– Median pay in 2021: $24,500
– Entry-level education needed: No formal educational credential

Similar to theaters, most amusement parks were closed during the COVID-19 pandemic. Now that restrictions have eased, amusement parks are seeing surges in attendance. This means they have a need for labor to work at the parks, and many also offer on-the-job training so that as many people as possible can help the crowds enjoy their visits.

A barista grinding coffee beans
Canva

Hosting staff, restaurant, lounge, and coffee shop

– Projected growth by 2030: 84,200 jobs (up 25% from 2020)
– Median pay in 2021: $24,600
– Entry-level education needed: No formal educational credential

Coffee shops were once havens for the self-employed who would come flocking during the day to get work done outside their homes. The pandemic transformed that, shuttering many coffee shops and lounges and forcing people to work from home. People are back in coffee shops typing away, so a steady supply of baristas are needed to serve them. Many coffee shops and lounges are willing to train new employees in everything from hospitality best practices to the art of making espresso.

A waiter bringing food to a table
Drazen Zigic // Shutterstock

Wait staff

– Projected growth by 2030: 407,600 jobs (up 20% from 2020)
– Median pay in 2021: $26,000
– Entry-level education needed: No formal educational credential

Restaurants were largely closed during the COVID-19 pandemic, and some were forced to close permanently. Many waiters quit during the pandemic as well, citing safety and other concerns. Since restrictions have eased, diners have been flocking back to restaurants, looking to make up for lost time. Those restaurants need all the help they can get serving patrons with pent-up demand, meaning they are more likely now than ever to offer on-the-job training.

A bartender mixing a drink
Monkey Business Images // Shutterstock

Bartenders

– Projected growth by 2030: 159,900 jobs (up 33% from 2020)
– Median pay in 2021: $26,350
– Entry-level education needed: No formal educational credential

At their best, bartenders have signature drinks they love whipping up for patrons, but this isn’t necessarily required before slipping on a bartender’s apron. Although there are programs that can teach people how to make expert drinks, this isn’t expected or the norm. Behind-the-counter training is still the golden standard in learning a number of skills, from mixing up the perfect mojito to striking up just the right kind of conversation with patrons.

Cafeteria attendants cleaning tables
TommyStockProject // Shutterstock

Dining room and cafeteria attendants and bartender helpers

– Projected growth by 2030: 103,600 jobs (up 27% from 2020)
– Median pay in 2021: $27,170
– Entry-level education needed: No formal educational credential

When people were working from home during the pandemic, many dining rooms and cafeterias inside office buildings closed down. This meant there was no need for cafeteria or dining room assistants. With people heading back to the office, at least part-time, organizations with cafeterias and dining rooms need to hire people to help keep them running smoothly. They are willing to train people on the job, potentially overlooking the fact that some may have never worked in the industry before. Moreover, formal training isn’t necessarily expected or required for these jobs.

A dishwasher arranging dishes to dry
U2M Brand // Shutterstock

Dishwashers

– Projected growth by 2030: 77,800 jobs (up 19% from 2020)
– Median pay in 2021: $28,130
– Entry-level education needed: No formal educational credential

As a diminished number of restaurants deal with a boom in demand post-pandemic, the need for all kinds of support within those restaurants has increased. This includes dishwashers, a shortage of which is spurring high wages. On-the-job training is standard for dishwashers, who are not expected to have any previous degree or experience before lacing up a dishwashing apron and helping keep things clean in between servings for restaurant patrons.

A person walking four dogs
Canva

Animal caretakers

– Projected growth by 2030: 93,600 jobs (up 34% from 2020)
– Median pay in 2021: $28,600
– Entry-level education needed: High school diploma or equivalent

Many people adopted animals during the COVID-19 pandemic to contend with the stress and loneliness of being locked inside. With so many new pet parents returning to their pre-pandemic lives, they may need extra help caring for their animals. This has created a significant demand for animal caretakers and a shortage of suppliers. Many prospective employers may be willing to allow someone without technical experience or training with animals to take care of their pets while they go about their lives.

A delivery driver driving a van with packages on the seat next to him
Canva

Drivers and sales workers

– Projected growth by 2030: 81,900 jobs (up 18% from 2020)
– Median pay in 2021: $29,280
– Entry-level education needed: High school diploma or equivalent

Drivers and sales workers transport cargo across long distances to be sold. There is currently a shortage of drivers, which means many employers will be more likely than ever to offer on-the-job training. Even under normal circumstances, all that is typically required to become a driver or sales worker is a clean driving record and a valid driver’s license.

A home health provider supporting a disabled senior with a walking stick
Photographee.eu // Shutterstock

Home health and personal care aides

– Projected growth by 2030: 1,129,900 jobs (up 33% from 2020)
– Median pay in 2021: $29,430
– Entry-level education needed: High school diploma or equivalent

An increasing number of Americans are hoping to stay in their homes as they age. This has coincided with a shortage of home health and personal care aides, who are, in many cases, leaving the profession due to low pay. For those willing to enter the profession now, many are being offered on-the-job training even if they haven’t had prior experience in home health and personal care aiding.

A dance instructor leading a ballet class of young children
antoniodiaz // Shutterstock

Recreation workers

– Projected growth by 2030: 57,800 jobs (up 16% from 2020)
– Median pay in 2021: $29,680
– Entry-level education needed: High school diploma or equivalent

Recreation workers wear many hats, but they generally lead groups of people or individuals in recreational activities. These activities can include everything from sports to the arts. The need for such workers is projected to grow by 16% through 2030, which is much faster than the average for all occupations. This translates to employers being more likely than ever to offer on-the-job training to meet demand.

Taxis on a busy city street
Cameris // Shutterstock

Passenger vehicle drivers

– Projected growth by 2030: 180,600 jobs (up 26% from 2020)
– Median pay in 2021: $31,340
– Entry-level education needed: No formal educational credential
-Note: Metric excludes bus drivers, transit and intercity

Passenger vehicle drivers operate cars for individuals. This job category includes Uber and Lyft drivers as well as taxi drivers. There has been a severe shortage of drivers since the pandemic, led in part by higher fuel prices that are eating into driver profits. This has led to surging fares for passengers and widespread frustration. As such, platforms are extremely interested in recruiting as many new drivers as possible and are willing to provide on-the-job training as needed. All that is typically needed is a clean driving record and a valid license. 

A psychologist and their patient talking during an appointment
YAKOBCHUK VIACHESLAV // Shutterstock

Social and human service assistants

– Projected growth by 2030: 69,500 jobs (up 17% from 2020)
– Median pay in 2021: $37,610
– Entry-level education needed: High school diploma or equivalent

Social and human service assistants provide myriad services. Broadly, they help people in fields including psychology, social work, and rehabilitation. Employment in the arena is projected to grow 17% through 2030, which is much higher than the national average for all occupations. To make sure they can meet the demand, many employers will offer on-the-job training to workers new to the field.

A personal trainer helping a client stretch
Canva

Exercise trainers and group fitness instructors

– Projected growth by 2030: 121,700 jobs (up 39% from 2020)
– Median pay in 2021: $40,700
– Entry-level education needed: High school diploma or equivalent

Exercise trainers and group fitness instructors help people get and stay in shape. They may work as personal trainers with clients individually or lead classes for a larger franchise. Although there are programs and degrees that can give people credentials to become trainers and fitness instructors, the rise of streaming and social media has turned the need for such credentials on its head. Instructors can now become extremely popular and acquire clients simply through the popularity of their online content.

This story originally appeared on Tovuti LMS and was produced and
distributed in partnership with Stacker Studio.

This story was written by Stacker and has been re-published pursuant to a CC BY-NC 4.0 License.

This post was originally published on this site

Stacker

This story was written by Stacker and has been re-published pursuant to a CC BY-NC 4.0 License.

Founded in 2017, Stacker combines data analysis with rich editorial context, drawing on authoritative sources and subject matter experts to drive storytelling.