oldest buildings in newport ri

Newport has the highest concentrations of colonial homes in the nation, the What’sUpNewp crew started this project as a list of the “Top 10 oldest houses in Newport”. It wasn’t soon after starting our research that we found ourselves digging deeper and deeper into Newport’s history completely fascinated.

It’s still completely mind-numbing trying to understand just how many buildings, homes, and structures still stand from more than 250 years ago, before the American Revolution.

Some of these homes still stand the way they were 250 years ago, but many of these homes were restored in the late 20th century through grants made by Newport resident Doris Duke and the Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) and/or preserved by other organizations.

The Oldest Buildings In Newport, RI

While we tried to keep our list to 50 of the oldest buildings in Newport we realized we’d be leaving off some pretty neat buildings that were built before 1765 (like Touro Synagogue, Brick Market, and the Malbone House) so we decided to include a few extra! Did we miss something? E-mail Ryan@whatsupnewp.com

This story was originally published on August 25, 2015. It has been updated and is being reshared due to its popularity.

Gideon Cornell House (1765)

The Gideon Cornell House is a good example of a simple half house, also known as the three-bay plan.

Located on the original site, it has two stories, a gable roof, and a central interior chimney. Parts of the house may date from earlier than 1765. The doorway is Federal in style and was probably a later addition for purposes of modernization.

The Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) purchased the house in 1969 and restored it in 1970. It was the first house NRF leased to residential tenants. More Info

Source for info: Newport Restoration Foundation

Touro Synagogue (1763)

The Touro Synagogue building was completed in 1763 and was dedicated during the Chanukah festival celebrations on December 2nd of that year. The dedication ceremony was a regional celebration attended not only by the congregation, but also by clergy and other dignitaries from around the colony including Congregationalist Minister Ezra Stiles who later became the president of Yale University. His diaries have proven a treasure trove of information on Newport, the Rhode Island colony, and the Jewish community of the mid-eighteenth century. More Info

Source for info and image: Touro Synagogue

Cahoone-Yates (1763)

The Cahoone -Yates House is a two-story building with three interior chimneys and a gable roof. It was originally built c.1763 as a double house, and is one of several eighteenth-century buildings of this style that still exist in Newport.

Located on its original site, the house was purchased by the Newport Restoration Foundation in 1968 and restored in 1974-75. More Info

Source for info: Newport Restoration Foundation

Brick Market (1762)

The Brick Market Building 1

The Brick Market Building was designed by Peter Harrison and constructed in 1762. It originally functioned as an open-air market with merchants and offices on the upper floors. The building, located in the heart of Colonial Newport and directly across Washington Square from the Colony House, is considered one of Newport’s architectural treasures. It has had a varied history, including a printing office, a theater, and Town Hall, and has also been altered and renovated frequently over the years.

In 1928-1930 the building was completely restored under the guidance of Norman Isham, and the building was again restored before 1993 under the auspices of the Brick Market Foundation, led by Ralph Carpenter.

Owned by the City of Newport and managed by the NHS, the Brick Market Building is now home to the Museum of Newport History and the Museum Shop. More Info

Source for info and image: Newport Historical Society

Malbone House (1758)

Francis Malbone House Newport.jpg

The Francis Malbone House is a historic house at 392 Thames Street. Peter Harrison, one of colonial Newport’s most prominent architects, designed the Malbone House in 1758 using Georgian architecture styles. In 1975 the house was added to the National Register of Historic Places.

William Lawton House (1758)

The William Lawton House is a small, simple house with two stories and a gable roof. It has an interior chimney that is original to the building, though much restoration work was necessary to make the chimney function safely. The house was built c.1758 and is on the original site.

The Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) purchased the building in 1978 and restored it in 1979-80. More Info

Source for info: Newport Restoration Foundation

 John Tillinghast House (1758)

John Tillinghast House.jpg

The John Tillinghast House is an historic colonial house at 142 Mill Street (facing Touro Park) in Newport. It is a 2-1/2 story wood frame structure, built in 1760 for John Tillinghast, a wealthy merchant. A high-quality example of academic Georgian architecture, the house was a (often temporary) home for a number of notable people during and after the American Revolutionary War.

It was probably occupied by the Marquis de Chastellux, an engineer in the French Army while it was stationed in Newport, and by General Nathanael Greene, who hosted George Washington and the Marquis de Lafayette on a visit to Newport. From 1821 to 1824 it was home to William C. Gibbs while he was Governor of Rhode Island.

Source for info and image: Newport Historical Society

Sherborne-Nichols House (1758-1774)

The exterior of the Sherborne-Nichols House fits the plan of a four-bay house scheme so typical in Newport from 1740 to 1815. When the building was restored, (or perhaps rebuilt is a better term), the size and exterior proportions that typify the eighteenth century were kept and enhanced.

Built c.1758-1774, the house was originally located on Coddington Street and was moved by the Foundation for the Preservation of America’s Architectural Heritage (FPAAH) to its current location on Elm Street in 1968.

The Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) purchased the building in 1969 and restored it in 1970. More Info

Source for info: Newport Restoration Foundation

 Vernon House (1758)

Vernon House, a national historic landmark, has a rich architectural and social history. In 1758, Metcalf Bowler, a wealthy merchant purchased a small but elegant house at the corner of Clarke, and Mary Streets. He quickly expanded the house to its current form around 1760. It has been long suspected that the expansion was designed by noted architect Peter Harrison who is responsible for the Redwood Library, Touro Synagogue and the Old Brick Market.

In 1773 it was purchased by another wealthy Newport merchant, William Vernon. A lovely example of Georgian architecture, Vernon House is one of Newport’s last grand merchant’s houses, and played host to many notable guests during Vernon’s ownership. More Info

Source for info: Newport Restoration Foundation

Constant Tabor House (1750-1803)

The Constant Tabor House is a four-bay, two-story building with a gambrel roof, a large interior chimney, and a well-proportioned pediment doorway in the Georgian style. The original site of the house remains speculative until more conclusive evidence is found.

The house was purchased by the Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) in 1969 and restored in 1970 -71. More Info

Source for info: Newport Restoration Foundation

Buliod-Perry House (1750)

The Buliod-Perry House is a large three-story, five-bay house with a hip roof and two interior chimneys. Located on the original site, it is one of the few remaining eighteenth-century structures on Washington Square. The build date of c.1750 is supported by a record of Peter Buliod giving to Lewis Buliod the “large new house” in 1757.

The house was purchased by the Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) in 1973 and restored in 1976-77. More Info

Source for info: Newport Restoration Foundation

John Whitehorne House (1750)

The John Whitehorne House, circa 1750, is on its original site. It is a two story, five bay, shallow hipped-roofed Georgian house with two interior chimneys. The floor plan has a central hallway – front to back – with the stairway on the back wall. There are four primary rooms on each floor, one in each corner. The house has a restrained Georgian elegance, which may owe much to the Quakers who had a strong influence on the look of 18th century Newport, both in the design of buildings and furniture.

The Newport Restoration Foundation purchased the house in 1969 and restored it in 1974-75. More Info

Source for info: Newport Restoration Foundation

Knowles-Perry House (1750)

The Knowles-Perry House is typical of the five-bay, two-story houses with gambrel roofs that were built in mid-eighteenth-century Newport. The building has a center chimney and three dormer windows on the third floor that alternate triangular pediments with a curved pediment in the center. This detail, copied from the many English design books illustrating patterns derived from Palladio (and ultimately Vitruvius), was often used during the Georgian period in Newport. Built c.1750, the house stands on the original site.

It was purchased by the Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) in 1970 and restored as a domestic dwelling in 1975-76. More Info

Source for info: Newport Restoration Foundation

Brown Farm House (1750)

The Brown Farm House is a two-story, four-bay structure with a central chimney. The house originally stood in Middletown, Rhode Island, just off West Main Road where it was built c.1750.

The Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) purchased the house from Saint Lucy’s Church in 1979, disassembled it, and moved the house to Green Street where it was restored in 1979-80. The house is also referred to by some as St. Lucy’s House. More Info

Source for info: Newport Restoration Foundation

Redwood Library (1750)

The Redwood Library and Athenæum was chartered in 1747 and opened in 1750. It was the first library in Rhode Island, is the oldest lending library in America, and is also the oldest lending library building in continuous use in the country. More Info

Source for info and image: Redwood Library

Captain George Buckmaster House (1748)

The Captain George Buckmaster House is a four-bay house (also known as a three-quarter house), but not in the traditional sense.

Here the doorway is at the end of the front façade, rather than within the façade. Additionally, the chimney is located in a center position, rather than the more common end location when the doorway is located in an end bay.

The house was built c.1748 and sits on the original site. It was purchased by the Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) in 1969 and restored in 1972. More Info

Source for info: Newport Restoration Foundation

Hunter House (1748)

Hunter House is one of the finest examples of Georgian Colonial architecture from Newport’s “golden age” in the mid-18th century. The house was built and decorated when Newport was a cosmopolitan city with a principle of religious tolerance that attracted Quakers, Baptists, Congregationalists and Sephardic Jews. The great mercantile families lived patrician lives, building harbor-front mansions overlooking their trading ships, and entertained in grand style. They bought furniture and silver from local craftsmen and were the patrons of such important early painters as Robert Feke and Gilbert Stuart.

Hunter House is open seasonally. More Info

Source for info: Preservation Society of Newport county

Jahleel Brenton Counting House (1748)

The Jahleel Brenton Counting House was originally located on or near an area called Champlin’s Wharf, on the west (water side) of Thames Street near the corner of Mary Street.

The Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) purchased the house in 1969 and relocated it to the current site on Washington Street where it was rebuilt and restored in 1975-76. More Info

Source for info: Newport Restoration Foundation

Phillip Stevens House (1745)

The Phillip Stevens House, c.1745, is on its original site. It is a four bay square plan house with a gable roof. The house has two stories and has a fine pediment doorway that seems to be original. The chimney in this house is located so that fireplaces on each floor heat the front and back rooms.

The more usual plan for a house of this date would position the chimney so that three rooms could be served by individual fireplaces on each floor, leaving only the narrow room occupying the single bay unheated. In the case of the Stevens House this is the bay to the right of the front door. More Info

Source for info: Newport Restoration Foundation

Captain William Read House (1740 & 1760)

The Captain William Read House is a sizable, two-and-a-half-story house with a gambrel roof and placed end-to-the-street. The house is on its original site and was built between 1740 and 1760. One large interior central chimney dominates the roof. Three peak-roofed dormers on each side add light to the third-floor interior and lend visual interest to the exterior. It is unclear if the house appears on the Stiles Map of 1758, but the design and style of the building strongly suggests the build date.

It stands on its original site and was purchased by the Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) in 1971 and restored in 1975 -76. More Info

Source for info: Newport Restoration Foundation

Sisson-Collins House (1738 & 1823)

The Sisson-Collins House, built c. 1738 and 1823, is an example of a building that, over a period of approximately one hundred and fifty years, was owned by well-to-do individuals, each of whom was greater in wealth and prominence than the previous owner.

The house stands on its original site and was purchased by the Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) in 1974. Restoration began the same year and was finished in 1975. The result is a collection of styles blended into a somewhat odd whole, as each succeeding owner sought to leave a mark and bring the current taste of their time, along with a renewed sense of importance, to an old building. More Info

Source for info: Newport Restoration Foundation

Old Colony House (1736)

The Colony House
The Colony House. Photo by Aaron Usher III.

The Newport Colony House is the fourth oldest statehouse still standing in the United States. It was designed by builder/architect Richard Munday, who also designed Trinity Church and the Seventh Day Baptist Meeting House in Newport. The Colony House was built between 1736 and 1739 by Benjamin Wyatt, and tradition maintains that a great number of African-Americans were employed in its construction.

The Colony House is owned by the State of Rhode Island and managed by the Newport Historical Society. More Info

Source for info and image: Newport Historical Society

Clarke Street Meeting House (1735)

Clarke Street Meetinghouse.JPG

The meeting house was built in 1735 and served as a worship place for the Second Congregational Church, originally a Calvinist congregation. From 1755 to 1786, Ezra Stiles, a well-known minister who later became president of Yale University, pastored the church and lived in the Ezra Stiles House across the street.

Source for info and image: Newport Historical Society

Richardson-Peckham House (1735)

The Richardson-Peckham House has a combination of roof styles that gives the impression the house had been cut short for some reason during its building. At the street side, the roof has a gable-on-hip profile, while the rear gable has a broad-pitched gambrel profile. With correct proportions, there would be about a third more depth to the structure and the rear roof would be the same style as the front.

Built c.1735-55, the structure is on the original site and was purchased by the Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) in 1968 and restored in 1972. More Info

Source for info: Newport Restoration Foundation

Thomas Townsend House (1735-1750)

The Thomas Townsend House is a two-story, gambrel-roof building with a single interior chimney, and is quite typical of small, eighteenth-century houses with three and four bays. The house is on its original site and was built c.1735-1750. It was purchased by the Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) in 1968 and restored in 1974-75. More Info

Source for info: Newport Restoration Foundation

Neptune Thurston Home (1734)

Neptune Thurston lived at this home now located at 41 Walnut Street. Thurston was a cooper and barrel maker by trade. The home was originally located on Long Wharf. Newport legend suggests that a young Gilbert Stuart, one of early America’s most famous portrait painters, may have learned the craft of painting images from Neptune.

Swansea House (1731)

The Swansea House is a rural, one-and-a-half-story building with a central chimney and a gable roof. Built c. 1731, it is typical of the Narragansett Basin and has a fair amount of original fabric on the interior, including mantles, moldings, and doors. The house originally stood in Swansea, Massachusetts and was purchased by the Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) in 1977. It was disassembled and put in storage until 1981-82 when NRF re-assembled and restored the house on the Cozzens Court site. More Info

Source for info: Newport Restoration Foundation

John Coddington House (1730)

Built c. 1730, the John Coddington House stands on its original site. It is a two-story building with two interior chimneys and a gambrel roof. The house was enlarged and altered in the mid-eighteenth century.

After being purchased by the Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) in 1971, it was restored in 1973-74 to reflect those later changes rather than restore the original structure as it was in 1730.

Source for info: Newport Restoration Foundation

John Sisson House (1730)

The John Sisson House is a small, one-and-a-half-story building of rural origins with a large center chimney and a gambrel roof. Built c.1730, the house was originally located on Old Mill Lane in Portsmouth, a town on the same island as Newport.

The Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) purchased the structure in 1974, disassembled it, and relocated it to the current site on Green Street where it was reconstructed and restored in 1974-75. More Info

Source for info: Newport Restoration Foundation

Harkness House (1730)

It is believed that the Harkness House, built c. 1730, was originally located on Thames Street near Pelham Street. It is an excellent example of the eighteenth-century, gambrel roof cottage, a style commonly found in Newport and of which there are many examples still standing.

The house has one-and-a-half stories, with two rooms on each floor, and a central chimney. There is a fireplace in each of the first floor rooms, but only one on the second floor. The house was purchased by the Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) in 1983 and restored in 1983-84. More Info

Source for info: Newport Restoration Foundation

John Beard House (1730)

Editor’s Note: A readers has told us that their family great up in the “John Beard House” at 31 Willow Street in the Point Section of Newport and that it was built in 1730. Not much public information is available for this property.

Seventh Day Baptist Meeting House (1729)

Seventh Day Baptist Meeting House
The newly restored Seventh Day Baptist Meeting House.

The oldest surviving Baptist church building in America, The Seventh Day Baptist Meeting House boasts a beautifully carved pulpit and interior paneling. The meeting house was constructed in 1730 by Richard Munday on Barney Street, and can now be seen as part of the Newport Historical Society’s building.

The grand reopening of the newly-restored Seventh Day Baptist Meeting House was celebrated the summer of 2009, in conjunction with a rare clothing exhibit, From Homespun to High Fashion.

This restoration project was funded by grants from the van Beuren Charitable Foundation, the Rhode Island Historical Preservation & Heritage Commission, and the Seventh Day Baptist Historical Society. More Info

Source for info and image: Newport Historical Society

Solomon Townsend House (1728)

The Solomon Townsend House is a two-story structure, built on the half house or three-bay plan with a central interior chimney and a gambrel roof. The building is a fine example of the simple, small houses that were built with great frequency on the Point during the eighteenth century.

The house stands on its original site and was purchased by the Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) in 1973 and restored in 1976-77. More Info

Source for info: Newport Restoration Foundation

Trinity Episcopal Church (1726)

The Anglican Church came relatively late to Newport; early settlers moved here to get away from the Church of England. By 1698, however, there were enough Anglicans, joined by Huguenots and Quakers, to form Trinity’s first congregation.

The congregation quickly outgrew its 1701 home, and in 1726 built the church in which people worship in today. The box pews helped to keep warmth during the winter before the building was heated – and today provide excellent enclosures for wandering toddlers. Their various shapes and sizes reflect the individuality of the members of the congregation, who paid for their own pews as a way of defraying the cost of the building. The first and second bays at the altar end were added in 1762, as the congregation continued to expand. More Info

Source for info: Trinity Church

Pitt’s Head Tavern (1726) 

This building, constructed some time before 1726, originally stood on Queen Street, now Washington Square at the corner of Charles Street. In 1742, Henry Collins, a successful merchant-privateer bought it. Collins helped found Redwood Library, and served on the committee responsible for the building of the Seventh Day Baptist Meeting House. Almost immediately the house was given to Henry Collin’s niece, Mary Ward (daughter of Governor Richard Ward) upon her marriage to Ebenezer Flagg.

In 1765 the Widow Mary Ward Flagg sold the house to Robert Lillibridge who turned the building into a coffeehouse, which became known as the “Pitts Head Tavern.”During the American Revolution, the tavern served as recruiting headquarters of the British during their occupation of Newport. In 1877, the Odd Fellows purchased the building and moved it further north on Charles Street. In 1947 the building was purchased by the Preservation Society of Newport County for use as offices. The Preservation Society sold the building in 1965 and it was moved to its present location and is now in private hands.

Source for info: Newport Historical Society

The Bird’s Nest (1725 – 1750)

The Bird's Nest cottage Newport RI.jpg

The Bird’s Nest is a historic house at 526 Broadway at the One Mile Corner junction in Newport, Rhode Island, not far from the city line with Middletown. It is a 2-1/2 story wood frame structure, three bays wide and two deep, with a gable roof and a large central chimney.

Source for info and image: Newport Historical Society

Isaac Dayton House (1725)

The Issac Dayton House is a small, two-story house with three bays and a gable roof. It was built c.1725 and is on the original site.

The Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) purchased the building in 1969 and restored it in 1971-72. More Info

Source for info: Newport Restoration Foundation

Edith Corey House (1725)

Built c.1725, the Edith Corey House is a square, hip-roof building constructed with three bays and an interior chimney. To provide more living space for this otherwise small building, an eighteenth-century, two-story structure was added. It is believed that the house was originally located on the corner of Willow and Washington Streets and sometime after 1758 was moved to Walnut Street. This is indicated by The Stiles Map of 1758, which shows the house at its original site at Willow and Washington Streets in that year.

The Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) purchased the building in 1973 and restored it in 1976-77. More Info

Source for info: Newport Restoration Foundation

Stacy House (1725)

Stacy House, according to a historical book by Antoinette Dowling, was built in 1725.

Stacy House was 1 Fourth Street until the railway took over Fourth Street, then the house became 1 Willow Street. The railroad tracks run along the front of the house.

A large addition was added sometime in the 1800s. It is now a three family house. More Info

Source for info and image: Stacy House

Simeon Potter House (1723)

Located at 25 Marsh Street

Potter (c.1720-1806), a privateer, participated in the burning of the British revenue ship HMS Gaspee in 1772. Potter’s donation of this house, a store, and garden to the Trustees of Long Wharf in 1795 led to the opening in 1814 of the first free public school in Newport, (for boys only).

The Simeon Potter House now operates as the Captain Simeon Potter House, a bed and breakfast.

Source for info and image: Newport Historical Society

 Rev. Daniel Wightman House (1721)

Located at 2 Coddington Street

Rev. Daniel Wightman (1668-1750), a carpenter who became a minister later in life, moved to Newport from N. Kingston, RI in the 1690s and built this house. Altered over the years, it now bears little resemblance to how it first appeared.

Wightman was one of the twenty-one persons who broke off from the First Baptist Church in that place, and established the Second in 1656.

Source for info and image: Newport Historical Society

Benjamin Howland House (1721)

Beginning in 1721, the Benjamin Howland House was built in three stages. The center, one-and-a-half-story gambrel roof section was built during the first quarter of the eighteenth century. The ell was added sometime later and finally, around 1795, a small, two-story, two-bay section was built.

The building originally stood in Dartmouth, Massachusetts where, in 1969, it was threatened with imminent demolition by the property owner. In the same year, the Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) purchased the house, disassembled it, and stored it until a site in Newport could be determined. The structure was then restored on the Bridge Street site in 1974 -75.

Source for info: Newport Restoration Foundation

The Cotton House (1720)

The Cotton House, built c.1720, is a two-and-a-half-story building with two interior chimneys and a gable-on-hip roof. The house was purchased by the Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) in 1974 and was moved to its current site in 1977 from the original location in the southwestern section of the parking lot it now adjoins. It was restored in 1979-80. More Info

Source for info: Newport Restoration Foundation

Thomas Walker House (1720)

The King’s Arms Tavern is a sizeable, two-and-a-half-story building with a large central chimney. The roof is hipped on the street end and gabled on the other. Built c.1720, the house stands on its original site. The Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) purchased the house in 1968 and restored it in 1973.

This building may, in fact, have parts of its structure dating from the late seventeenth century, or it may have been built in an older style at a later time. Records of any certainty can only be traced to 1721. The chimney and its fireplaces give substance to speculation about earlier construction, since the two main first-floor fireplaces are built with curved sidewalls and there is a cove above the fireplace lintel. These elements are indicative of seventeenth-century Newport construction techniques. More Info

Source for info: Newport Restoration Foundation

Hathaway-Macomber House (1715)

The Hathaway-Macomber House appears today as a large, gable-roof house with a five-bay façade and a substantial center chimney. Built c.1715, the structure was originally located in Assonet, a village of Freetown, Massachusetts, which is north of Fall River and east of the current Route 24.

The Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) purchased and disassembled the house in 1974 and relocated it to Newport. The house was then reconstructed and restored at its current site on Thames Street in 1974-75. More Info

Source for info: Newport Restoration Foundation

Lucas-Johnston House (1713)

Lucas Johnston House.jpg

The Lucas-Johnston House (also known as Augustus Lucas House) is an historic colonial house at 40 Division Street in downtown Newport, Rhode Island.

The Lucas-Johnston House was built around 1712-1713. It was the home to French Huguenot settler, Augustus Lucas, a slave trader and attorney, and later his grandson, Augustus Johnston, who was a Tory who served as Rhode Island Attorney General and is the namesake of Johnston, Rhode Island. The house was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971

Source for info and image: Newport Historical Society

Daniel Carr House (1712)

The Daniel Carr House was built c.1712 and stands on the original site. It has a steep gable roof and a one-room-deep plan so often found in Newport buildings in the first quarter of the eighteenth century.

Both the wide overhang of the roof in the front and end positions of the chimney are features that indicate an early, simple Newport house.

It was purchased by the Newport Restoration Foundation in 1974 and restored in 1976. More Info

Source for info: Newport Restoration Foundation

 Langley-King House (1710 & 1750)

The Langley-King House is a large, two-and-a-half-story, four-bay house with two interior chimneys, a gambrel roof, and a stunning split-pediment doorway that is original to the building. Built c. 1710 and 1750, the original house was most likely a small single-chimney structure built by Nathaniel Langley. Major remodeling to effect the Georgian style seen today was done by a subsequent owner of the property, Charles Handy, probably in the mid-eighteenth century.

The house is on its original site and was purchased by the Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) in 1969 and restored in 1970-71. More Info

Source for info: Newport Restoration Foundation

 Coggeshall House (1710)

The Coggeshall House is a small, one-and-a-half-story house with a stone central chimney and a gambrel roof. The building originally stood in Westport, Massachusetts and was built c.1710. The Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) purchased the house in 1977, disassembled it, and relocated it to the William Street site.

The house came to NRF with a frame, chimney stone, and interior detail all in good condition and was restored in 1977-78. More Info

Source for info: Newport Restoration Foundation

Almy-Taggart House (1710)

The Almy -Taggart House is a two-story house with a large interior chimney and a gambrel roof. The building is set end-to-the-street with the main entry on the street façade.

Built c.1710, the house is on its original site. It was purchased by the Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) in 1973 and restored in 1975. More Info

Source for info: Newport Restoration Foundation

Beriah Brown House (1709)

The Beriah Brown House, built c.1709, is a large two-story, five-bay plan building with a gambrel roof and a large center chimney. It was originally located on South County Trail (Rt. 2 at the 104 intersection) in the rural area of North Kingstown, Rhode Island.

The Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) acquired the already disassembled house in 1972 and then rebuilt and restored it at its current site on Mill Street in 1975-76. More Info

Source for info: Newport Restoration Foundation

Odlin-Otis House (1709)

Built c.1705, the Odlin-Otis House is a long, one-room deep, gable-roof building that stands on the original site. The south end wall is brick and includes a chimney with a fireplace on each floor, including the attic. An interior chimney at the north end affords one fireplace on each of the first and second floors. Both the interior and exterior walls are of plank construction, and an ell to the rear is of mixed construction, some parts dating from 1730, others from the nineteenth century.

The Newport Restoration Foundation bought the house in 1972 and restored it in 1976-77. More Info

Source for info: Newport Restoration Foundation

David Braman, Sr. House (1706)

The David Bramen Sr. House is unique in that, although small and originally built c.1706 on the hall/chamber plan, it clearly represents three distinct periods of early architectural style.

The house is on its original site and was purchased by the Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) in 1969. It was restored in 1971-72. More Info

Source for info: Newport Restoration Foundation

The Simon Pease House (1700)

The Simon Pease House is one of the earliest buildings in the architectural collection of the Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF). Built c.1700, it has a seventeenth-century frame and interior.

The exterior treatment reflects the style of the second quarter of the eighteenth century. This type of modernization of early houses was not uncommon in Newport.

The building is on its original site and was purchased by NRF in 1969 and restored in 1971. More Info

Source for info: Newport Restoration Foundation

Buffum-Redwood House (1700 & 1750)

The Buffum-Redwood House, c.1700 and 1750, was built on the present site and now stands as a two-story, five-bay building with a center chimney. It was originally constructed as a two-story, end-chimney house on the early Rhode Island one-room plan (also called the hall/chamber plan).

In 1975, the Redevelopment Agency of Newport named the Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) as the preferred developer of this property, along with the abutting property at 72 Spring Street. After purchasing the property in the same year, NRF restored the building in 1976-77. More Info

Source for info: Newport Restoration Foundation

Great Friends Meeting House (1699)

Newport Friends Meetinghouse.JPG

The Great Friends Meeting House, built in 1699, is the oldest surviving house of worship in Rhode Island. Quakers, as they were dubbed by their detractors, were the most influential of Newport’s numerous early congregations. They dominated the political, social, and economic life of the town into the 18th century, and their “plain style” of living was reflected in Newport’s architecture, decorative arts and early landscape. More Info

Source for info and image: Newport Historical Society

Wanton-Lyman-Hazard House (1697)

Wanton-Lyman-Hazard House
Located on corner of Broadway and Stone Street

The oldest surviving house in Newport, the Wanton-Lyman-Hazard House was built for Stephen Mumford ca.1697. Mumford was a merchant and a founding member of Newport’s Seventh Day Baptist congregation.The house passed to Mumford’s son, Stephen Mumford, Jr., and then was sold to Richard Ward, a lawyer who became governor of the colony of Rhode Island in 1741. During the Revolution, Ward’s son Samuel also was elected to that office.

Tours of the house include discussion of recent findings and discoveries, and incorporate information from the ongoing archaeological investigation. Architecture, colonial lifestyles, and family history are also included. More Info

Source for info and image: Newport Historical Society

Solomon Thornton-Elizabeth Wilder House (1683 & 1741)

The Solomon Thornton-Elizabeth Wilder House, with build dates c.1683 and 1741, is a large, seven-bay house with a gable roof and a central chimney. The structure was originally located in Johnston, Rhode Island.

In 1971, the house was donated to the Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) by the Allendale Mutual Insurance Company of Johnston, RI. The building was then disassembled and put in storage by NRF until a new location could be determined. It was reconstructed and restored on its current site in 1973-74. More Info

Source for info: Newport Restoration Foundation

Capt. John Mawdsley House (1680)

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Located at 228 Spring Street

The earliest rear part of the house was built on Spring Street before 1680, probably by Jireh Bull. Bull married Godsgift Arnold, daughter of Gov. Benedict Arnold. Captain John Mawdsley, a privateer, lived in the house in the eighteenth century and constructed the large front addition to the house.

Source for info and image: Newport Historical Society

John Bliss House (1679)

The John Bliss House is an historic stone ender house on 2 Wilbur Avenue near Bliss Road. The late seventeenth century Jacobean house is one of the oldest surviving buildings in Rhode Island.

The large farmhouse was built around 1679/1680 by Quaker Elder, John Bliss, on land deeded to him by his father-in-law Governor Benedict Arnold, Rhode Island’s first Governor and great grandfather to the Revolutionary War traitor of the same name. John Bliss deeded the property and house to his son in 1715. The house features a large stone chimney at one end. It remains privately owned as of 2015.

Source for info and image: Newport  Historical Society

White Horse Tavern (1673)

White Horse Tavern

Originally constructed in 1652, the tavern began as the two story residence of Francis Brinley, “the massively framed building and quarter acre of land fenced with Pailes at the corner of Farewell and Marlborough Streets” was acquired by William Mayes, Sr. in 1673 and he converted it to a tavern. Not everyone read in those early days, and public establishments identified themselves with symbols – a white horse signified tavern. More Info

Source for info and image: White Horse Tavern

Newport Tower (1670)

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The Newport Tower is a round stone tower located in Touro Park in Newport, Rhode Island. The tower has received attention due to speculation that it is actually several centuries older and would thus represent evidence of pre-Columbian or Viking trans-oceanic contact.

Source for info and image: Newport Historical Society


Sources: Information and photographs obtained from the National Registry Of Historic Places, The Preservation Society Of Newport County, and the Newport Restoration Foundation where noted.