The Nature Conservancy announced this week that they are expanding its work to address climate change in Rhode Island with municipal, state, regional and federal strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, promote adaptation to climate change impacts, and advance climate justice for the communities and people disproportionately affected.

The Conservancy says that they have hired Sue AnderBois as the Climate and Energy Program Manager to lead the expanded work.

“All of The Nature Conservancy’s gains to protect our land and water over the past decades are threatened by our changing climate. It is essential that we invest now in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and improving climate resilience to be able to protect Rhode Islanders and our natural resources,” said John Torgan, state director in a press release. “Sue’s leadership will significantly expand the capacity and focus of our team. Her experience creating collaborative, innovative solutions will help elevate Rhode Island’s growing momentum for climate action at the scale and pace the science deems necessary.”

On accepting the position, AnderBois said in a statement “Climate change is the biggest threat facing our planet, and Rhode Island is the perfect place to innovate solutions in policy, resiliency, and climate justice. I am thrilled to be joining the inspiring team at the Conservancy to lead this work.”

AnderBois most recently served as Rhode Island’s first director of food strategy. In that role, she worked with colleagues across state government and throughout Rhode Island’s food system to develop Relish Rhody – Rhode Island’s Food Strategy, which was released by Governor Raimondo in May 2017. Previously she was a policy analyst for the New England Clean Energy Council, and a contractor for the Rhode Island Office of Energy Resources on energy efficiency and solar programs. She is currently the Chair of the City of Providence Sustainability Task Force and a board member of the Green Energy Consumers Alliance. Prior to moving to Rhode Island, she spent 5 years in energy efficiency policy at the Energy Foundation. She has an MBA from Yale School of Management and a B.A in Environmental Studies from Dartmouth College.

The Nature Conservancy’s Rhode Island Climate and Energy Program includes:

  • Advocacy to achieve net zero carbon emissions through mandatory reduction targets
  • Promoting the acceleration of clean energy development through smart siting of off-shore wind and land-based solar projects
  • Advancing climate resiliency through smart infrastructure investments and the protection and restoration of natural resources

The Nature Conservancy is a global conservation organization dedicated to conserving the lands and waters on which all life depends. Guided by science, we create innovative, on-the-ground solutions to our world’s toughest challenges so that nature and people can thrive together. We are tackling climate change, conserving lands, waters and oceans at unprecedented scale, providing food and water sustainably and helping make cities more sustainable. Working in 72 countries, we use a collaborative approach that engages local communities, governments, the private sector, and other partners. To learn more, visit www.nature.org or follow @nature_press on Twitter.


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