PROVIDENCE –  A Providence man, Richard Koboi, aka Sunnyboy Taylor, 27, who organized and led a conspiracy to create and deposit approximately $330,000 worth of counterfeit checks, and who illegally possessed and then sold a firearm to a drug dealer, all while serving a state term of probation, was sentenced today to three years in federal prison, announced United States Attorney Zachary A. Cunha.

“Richard Koboi, undeterred by his prior state fraud conviction, decided to help himself to other people’s money using stolen banking information, confident that his crimes would go undetected,” remarked U.S. Attorney Cunha. “He could not have been more wrong.  Thanks to superb investigative work by our federal, state, and local law enforcement partners, Mr. Koboi’s campaign of criminality has ended where it belongs: with a well-earned sentence to federal prison.”

 “Today’s sentencing clearly illustrates that individuals who engage in these types of illegal activities will be held accountable for their actions,” stated Ketty Larco-Ward, Inspector in Charge of the U.S. Postal Inspection Service, Boston Division. “Bank fraud and identity theft are not victimless crimes and individuals who attempt to commit these crimes face significant penalties as a result of their criminal activity. Postal Inspectors are ever vigilant in bringing to justice individuals who use the U.S. Mail to defraud and otherwise take advantage of the financial circumstances of innocent consumers.”

Kobio previously admitted to a federal judge that he recruited bank employees and bank account holders to assist him in obtaining stolen banking information of unsuspecting victims and businesses. Koboi used the stolen information to create counterfeit checks that he deposited into his own bank, or that he provided to other individuals who he paid to deposit the checks into bank accounts that they controlled. After depositing the checks, Koboi and others made, or attempted to make, rapid withdrawals of cash from ATMs or bank tellers.

According to court documents, while soliciting a would-be co-conspirator via Facebook messages Koboi wrote:

Okay, so basically what I do is simple. I want you to know what it is I do isn’t legal but it’s safe. This isn’t something where you have to worry about cops or your bank and credit. I do business with individuals who have good history with the[ir] banks. I make typed up or written checks from offshore 300k plus accounts. That type up or written check will be made out to you where we will then deposit it into your account. Usually it days one business day to two the most for the money to be available. Once the account shows that the money is there we will then take the steps needed to take the money out of the account. We will then spilt 50/50. No middle man or bad blood. You will still be able too [sic] use and keep your account as well as do it again in the future if you please. Let’s eat.

Additionally, law enforcement discovered a Facebook “for sale” posting accompanied by a photograph of a firearm posted by Koboi; communications between Koboi and marijuana drug dealer, arranging for the purchase and delivery of the firearm displayed in the posting; and additional photographs of the firearm stored on Koboi’s cellphone. The firearm was later recovered by Cranston Police from the residence of a different drug dealer during an unrelated investigation.

Koboi pleaded guilty on April 27, 2020, to conspiracy to commit bank fraud, ten counts of bank fraud, and being a felon in possession of a firearm. He was sentenced today by U.S. District Court Chief  Judge John J. McConnell, Jr., to thirty-six months in federal prison; three years of federal supervised release; and ordered to pay restitution totaling $31,928, the actual loss to banks attributed to Koboi’s criminal conduct.

At the time of his arrest in these matters, Koboi was serving a term of state probation, having been convicted in 2018 in state court in an unrelated fraudulent check scheme. He was sentenced to a term of 5 years – with 18 months to serve, 3 years & 6 months suspended, and 5 years of probation.

The federal prosecution of this matter was handled by Assistant U.S. Attorney Ly T. Chin.

The case was investigated by the U.S. Postal Inspection Service, with the assistance of the FBI, United States Secret Service, ATF, Rhode Island State Police, Providence Police Department, and Delaware State Police.