Governor Gina M. Raimondo and Nicole Alexander-Scott, MD, MPH, the Director of the Rhode Island Department of Health (RIDOH) provided details yesterday on Rhode Island’s Early Warning Testing System, which will inform the state’s immediate response efforts and inform data modeling and forecasting for the weeks and months to come.

As part of the Early Warning Testing System, specific groups of high-contact workers who are asymptomatic can now be tested at no cost at a Rhode Island National Guard testing site (located at Community College of Rhode Island or Rhode Island College). To schedule a test, someone who is in one of these groups can go to portal.ri.gov. Alternatively, people can call RIDOH at 401-222-8022 to schedule a test. The asymptomatic workers who can schedule tests are:

  • Hair professionals
  • Nail artists 
  • Gym employees 
  • Tattoo artists
  • Massage therapists 
  • Child care workers

In addition to people in these groups, any Rhode Islander who attended a large protest or demonstration this weekend can (and should) get tested, even if they do not have symptoms. People who attended a large protest or demonstration can schedule a test by going to portal.ri.gov or calling 401-222-8022.

The Early Warning Testing System is the third of three facets to Rhode Island’s approach to testing. The first facet is Symptomatic Testing. Anyone with symptoms in Rhode Island can get tested, regardless of their profession or work situation. The second facet of Rhode Island’s approach to testing is Outbreak Rapid Response. This entails using testing as a tool to respond within hours of multiple cases discovered in places like congregate care settings, workplaces, and other high-density areas.    


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