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The combination of a light southeast wind and more than one knot of current flowing out of Narragansett Bay pushed the fleet of sailboats starting the Newport Bermuda Race on the way towards Bermuda on Friday afternoon with few incidents of note.

“In spite of the light conditions,” said Jonathan Brewin, chairman of the Bermuda Race Organizing Committee, “the New York Yacht Club race committee did a stellar job of starting our 17 classes safely.”

Only one boat among the 170 entries in the race failed to start, Araucaria, a 55-footer sailing in the Finisterre Division for amateur boats using cruising sails. Setting a pre-race course past Whitehawk, the 105-foot starting line boat anchored in the East Passage, a misjudgment of the strong current resulted in a collision between the boats and the retirement of the smaller vessel.

During the starting sequence, a McCurdy & Rhodes 38-footer named Selkie came too close to Whitehawk and was hung up for a while onWhitehawk’s massive bowsprit. Fortunately, after taking its penalty turns, Selkie was able to continue with the race.

The most exciting start was among the largest boats in the fleet, Class 15 in the Gibbs Hill Lighthouse Division. In this group of high-tech, high-speed, professionally crewed boats, the 88-foot Rambler 88, a former record holder for the Newport Bermuda course, started a little behind several smaller boats and made a breaktaking pass, threading its way right through the middle of the closely packed fleet.

“It was also exciting to watch all the starts of this race on social media for the first time,” said Brewin. The start was broadcast via Facebook Live for close to three hours, and a recording is available on the race’s Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/BermudaRace/).

The race continues for the next three to six days. How long depends on the size of boat and the strength of the winds between Newport and Bermuda. Currently, the forecast is for lighter winds. According to Brewin, “Preliminary projections are for a very strategic race, which could involve several ‘restarts’ when the wind dies and the fleet compresses.”

Race fans can follow the progress of each boat in the fleet on the Pantaenius tracker located on the BermudaRace.com website

Ryan Belmore is the Owner and Publisher of What'sUpNewp. 
Belmore has been involved with What’sUpNewp since shortly after its launch in 2012, proudly leading it to be named Best Local News Blog in Rhode Island by Rhode Island Monthly readers in 2018, 2019, and 2020 and an honorable mention in the Common Good Awards in 2021.

Born and raised in Rhode Island, Belmore graduated from Coventry High School and the Community College of Rhode Island. In addition to living in Newport for 10 years, he has lived in Portsmouth, Coventry, Providence, Smithfield, Burrillville, and East Greenwich.

Belmore currently serves as Vice President of the Board Of Directors for Fort Adams Trust and on the Board of Directors for Potter League For Animals. He previously served on the Board of Lucy's Hearth and the Arts & Cultural Alliance for Newport County.

Belmore and his wife, Jen, currently live in Alexandria, Virginia, a move they made in 2021. Read more about that here - https://whatsupnewp.com/2021/09/letter-from-the-publisher-some-personal-news/

Belmore visits Newport every couple of weeks to support the 12+ paid contributors What'sUpNewp has on the ground across Rhode Island, a place he called home for 39 years.

Belmore is a member of Local Independent Online News (LION) Publishers, Society of Professional Journalists, and the North American Snowsports Journalists Association.

In 2020, Belmore was named Member of the Year by LION and won the Arts & Cultural Alliance of Newport County's Dominque Award.
Belmore can be contacted at ryan@whatsupnewp.com and 401-662-1653.