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Built Before 1765: Oldest Buildings in Newport, RI


Benjamin Howland House (1721)

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Located at 6 Bridge Street

Beginning in 1721, the Benjamin Howland House was built in three stages. The center, one-and-a-half-story gambrel roof section was built during the first quarter of the eighteenth century. The ell was added sometime later and finally, around 1795, a small, two-story, two-bay section was built.

The building originally stood in Dartmouth, Massachusetts where, in 1969, it was threatened with imminent demolition by the property owner. In the same year, the Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) purchased the house, disassembled it, and stored it until a site in Newport could be determined. The structure was then restored on the Bridge Street site in 1974 -75.

Source for info and image: Newport Restoration Foundation

The Cotton House (1720)

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Located at 32 Church Street

The Cotton House, built c.1720, is a two-and-a-half-story building with two interior chimneys and a gable-on-hip roof. The house was purchased by the Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) in 1974 and was moved to its current site in 1977 from the original location in the southwestern section of the parking lot it now adjoins. It was restored in 1979-80. More Info

Source for info and image: Newport Restoration Foundation

Thomas Walker House (1720)

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Located at 6 Cross Street

The King’s Arms Tavern is a sizeable, two-and-a-half-story building with a large central chimney. The roof is hipped on the street end and gabled on the other. Built c.1720, the house stands on its original site. The Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) purchased the house in 1968 and restored it in 1973.

This building may, in fact, have parts of its structure dating from the late seventeenth century, or it may have been built in an older style at a later time. Records of any certainty can only be traced to 1721. The chimney and its fireplaces give substance to speculation about earlier construction, since the two main first-floor fireplaces are built with curved sidewalls and there is a cove above the fireplace lintel. These elements are indicative of seventeenth-century Newport construction techniques. More Info

Source for info and image: Newport Restoration Foundation

Hathaway-Macomber House (1715)

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Located at 57 Thames Street

The Hathaway-Macomber House appears today as a large, gable-roof house with a five-bay façade and a substantial center chimney. Built c.1715, the structure was originally located in Assonet, a village of Freetown, Massachusetts, which is north of Fall River and east of the current Route 24.

The Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) purchased and disassembled the house in 1974 and relocated it to Newport. The house was then reconstructed and restored at its current site on Thames Street in 1974-75. More Info

Source for info and image: Newport Restoration Foundation

Lucas-Johnston House (1713)

Lucas Johnston House.jpgThe Lucas-Johnston House (also known as Augustus Lucas House) is an historic colonial house at 40 Division Street in downtown Newport, Rhode Island.

The Lucas-Johnston House was built around 1712-1713. It was the home to French Huguenot settler, Augustus Lucas, a slave trader and attorney, and later his grandson, Augustus Johnston, who was a Tory who served as Rhode Island Attorney General and is the namesake of Johnston, Rhode Island. The house was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971

Source for info and image: Newport Historical Society

Daniel Carr House (1712)

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Located at 20 Division Street

The Daniel Carr House was built c.1712 and stands on the original site. It has a steep gable roof and a one-room-deep plan so often found in Newport buildings in the first quarter of the eighteenth century.

Both the wide overhang of the roof in the front and end positions of the chimney are features that indicate an early, simple Newport house.

It was purchased by the Newport Restoration Foundation in 1974 and restored in 1976. More Info

Source for info and image: Newport Restoration Foundation

 Langley-King House (1710 & 1750)

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Located at 34 Pelham Street

The Langley-King House is a large, two-and-a-half-story, four-bay house with two interior chimneys, a gambrel roof, and a stunning split-pediment doorway that is original to the building. Built c. 1710 and 1750, the original house was most likely a small single-chimney structure built by Nathaniel Langley. Major remodeling to effect the Georgian style seen today was done by a subsequent owner of the property, Charles Handy, probably in the mid-eighteenth century.

The house is on its original site and was purchased by the Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) in 1969 and restored in 1970-71. More Info

Source for info and image: Newport Restoration Foundation

 Coggeshall House (1710)

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Located at 66 William Street

The Coggeshall House is a small, one-and-a-half-story house with a stone central chimney and a gambrel roof. The building originally stood in Westport, Massachusetts and was built c.1710. The Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) purchased the house in 1977, disassembled it, and relocated it to the William Street site.

The house came to NRF with a frame, chimney stone, and interior detail all in good condition and was restored in 1977-78. More Info

Source for info and image: Newport Restoration Foundation

Almy-Taggart House (1710)

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Located at 56 Farewell Street

The Almy -Taggart House is a two-story house with a large interior chimney and a gambrel roof. The building is set end-to-the-street with the main entry on the street façade.

Built c.1710, the house is on its original site. It was purchased by the Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) in 1973 and restored in 1975. More Info

Source for info and image: Newport Restoration Foundation

Beriah Brown House (1709)

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Located at 41 Mill Street

The Beriah Brown House, built c.1709, is a large two-story, five-bay plan building with a gambrel roof and a large center chimney. It was originally located on South County Trail (Rt. 2 at the 104 intersection) in the rural area of North Kingstown, Rhode Island.

The Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) acquired the already disassembled house in 1972 and then rebuilt and restored it at its current site on Mill Street in 1975-76. More Info

Source for info and image: Newport Restoration Foundation

Odlin-Otis House (1709)

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Located at 109 Spring Street

Built c.1705, the Odlin-Otis House is a long, one-room deep, gable-roof building that stands on the original site. The south end wall is brick and includes a chimney with a fireplace on each floor, including the attic. An interior chimney at the north end affords one fireplace on each of the first and second floors. Both the interior and exterior walls are of plank construction, and an ell to the rear is of mixed construction, some parts dating from 1730, others from the nineteenth century.

The Newport Restoration Foundation bought the house in 1972 and restored it in 1976-77. More Info

Source for info and image: Newport Restoration Foundation

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