oldest buildings in newport ri

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Knowles-Perry House (1750)

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Located at 31 Walnut Street

The Knowles-Perry House is typical of the five-bay, two-story houses with gambrel roofs that were built in mid-eighteenth-century Newport. The building has a center chimney and three dormer windows on the third floor that alternate triangular pediments with a curved pediment in the center. This detail, copied from the many English design books illustrating patterns derived from Palladio (and ultimately Vitruvius), was often used during the Georgian period in Newport. Built c.1750, the house stands on the original site.

It was purchased by the Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) in 1970 and restored as a domestic dwelling in 1975-76. More Info

Source for info and image: Newport Restoration Foundation

Brown Farm House (1750)

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35 Green Street

The Brown Farm House is a two-story, four-bay structure with a central chimney. The house originally stood in Middletown, Rhode Island, just off West Main Road where it was built c.1750.

The Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) purchased the house from Saint Lucy’s Church in 1979, disassembled it, and moved the house to Green Street where it was restored in 1979-80. The house is also referred to by some as St. Lucy’s House. More Info

Source for info and image: Newport Restoration Foundation

Redwood Library (1750)

The Redwood Library and Athenæum was chartered in 1747 and opened in 1750. It was the first library in Rhode Island, is the oldest lending library in America, and is also the oldest lending library building in continuous use in the country. More Info

Source for info and image: Redwood Library

Captain George Buckmaster House (1748)

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Located at 42 Division Street

The Captain George Buckmaster House is a four-bay house (also known as a three-quarter house), but not in the traditional sense.

Here the doorway is at the end of the front façade, rather than within the façade. Additionally, the chimney is located in a center position, rather than the more common end location when the doorway is located in an end bay.

The house was built c.1748 and sits on the original site. It was purchased by the Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) in 1969 and restored in 1972. More Info

Source for info and image: Newport Restoration Foundation

Hunter House (1748)

Located at 54 Washington Street

Hunter House is one of the finest examples of Georgian Colonial architecture from Newport’s “golden age” in the mid-18th century. The house was built and decorated when Newport was a cosmopolitan city with a principle of religious tolerance that attracted Quakers, Baptists, Congregationalists and Sephardic Jews. The great mercantile families lived patrician lives, building harbor-front mansions overlooking their trading ships, and entertained in grand style. They bought furniture and silver from local craftsmen and were the patrons of such important early painters as Robert Feke and Gilbert Stuart.

Hunter House is open seasonally. More Info

Source for info and image: Preservation Society of Newport county

Jahleel Brenton Counting House (1748)

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Located at 39 Washington Street

The Jahleel Brenton Counting House was originally located on or near an area called Champlin’s Wharf, on the west (water side) of Thames Street near the corner of Mary Street.

The Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) purchased the house in 1969 and relocated it to the current site on Washington Street where it was rebuilt and restored in 1975-76. More Info

Source for info and image: Newport Restoration Foundation

Phillip Stevens House (1745)

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Located at 34 Thames Street

The Phillip Stevens House, c.1745, is on its original site. It is a four bay square plan house with a gable roof. The house has two stories and has a fine pediment doorway that seems to be original. The chimney in this house is located so that fireplaces on each floor heat the front and back rooms.

The more usual plan for a house of this date would position the chimney so that three rooms could be served by individual fireplaces on each floor, leaving only the narrow room occupying the single bay unheated. In the case of the Stevens House this is the bay to the right of the front door. More Info

Source for info and image: Newport Restoration Foundation

Captain William Read House (1740 & 1760)

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Located at 58 Thames Street

The Captain William Read House is a sizable, two-and-a-half-story house with a gambrel roof and placed end-to-the-street. The house is on its original site and was built between 1740 and 1760. One large interior central chimney dominates the roof. Three peak-roofed dormers on each side add light to the third-floor interior and lend visual interest to the exterior. It is unclear if the house appears on the Stiles Map of 1758, but the design and style of the building strongly suggests the build date.

It stands on its original site and was purchased by the Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) in 1971 and restored in 1975 -76. More Info

Source for info and image: Newport Restoration Foundation

Sisson-Collins House (1738 & 1823)

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Located at 40 School Street

The Sisson-Collins House, built c. 1738 and 1823, is an example of a building that, over a period of approximately one hundred and fifty years, was owned by well-to-do individuals, each of whom was greater in wealth and prominence than the previous owner.

The house stands on its original site and was purchased by the Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) in 1974. Restoration began the same year and was finished in 1975. The result is a collection of styles blended into a somewhat odd whole, as each succeeding owner sought to leave a mark and bring the current taste of their time, along with a renewed sense of importance, to an old building. More Info

Source for info and image: Newport Restoration Foundation

Old Colony House (1736)

The Colony House
The Colony House. Photo by Aaron Usher III.

The Newport Colony House is the fourth oldest statehouse still standing in the United States. It was designed by builder/architect Richard Munday, who also designed Trinity Church and the Seventh Day Baptist Meeting House in Newport. The Colony House was built between 1736 and 1739 by Benjamin Wyatt, and tradition maintains that a great number of African-Americans were employed in its construction.

The Colony House is owned by the State of Rhode Island and managed by the Newport Historical Society. More Info

Source for info and image: Newport Historical Society

Clarke Street Meeting House (1735)

Clarke Street Meetinghouse.JPG

The meeting house was built in 1735 and served as a worship place for the Second Congregational Church, originally a Calvinist congregation. From 1755 to 1786, Ezra Stiles, a well-known minister who later became president of Yale University, pastored the church and lived in the Ezra Stiles House across the street.

Source for info and image: Newport Historical Society

Richardson-Peckham House (1735)

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Located at 67 Thames Street

The Richardson-Peckham House has a combination of roof styles that gives the impression the house had been cut short for some reason during its building. At the street side, the roof has a gable-on-hip profile, while the rear gable has a broad-pitched gambrel profile. With correct proportions, there would be about a third more depth to the structure and the rear roof would be the same style as the front.

Built c.1735-55, the structure is on the original site and was purchased by the Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) in 1968 and restored in 1972. More Info

Source for info and image: Newport Restoration Foundation

Thomas Townsend House (1735-1750)

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Located at 53 Bridge Street

The Thomas Townsend House is a two-story, gambrel-roof building with a single interior chimney, and is quite typical of small, eighteenth-century houses with three and four bays. The house is on its original site and was built c.1735-1750. It was purchased by the Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) in 1968 and restored in 1974-75. More Info

Source for info and image: Newport Restoration Foundation

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